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Old 17-01-2011, 19:44   #1
Murph
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Default Importing a pup to the UK

I have been planning on a czech for some time now. In 2011 my situation will allow me to have one. Up until now I have only been looking at UK breeders but recently I wondered what are the practical and financial implications of getting a dog from outside the UK? Can anyone provide any information?
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Old 19-01-2011, 01:37   #2
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Hello,

I am not in the UK but I have helped to arrange travel for friends' pets to UK and other rabies-free countries..

The problem is that the whole DEFRA PETS scheme process for bypassing quarantine takes about 7 months total including the blood titer waiting time of 6 months, and that is if the dog is able to have a rabies vaccination at the beginning of that 7 months.

Since typically dogs are not given the rabies vaccine until about 4 months old, that is another added 4 months. So from beginning to end you are looking at a dog just shy of its 1st birthday when you finally do receive it.

That is if you can find a breeder or an owner who will do the whole process for you and keep the dog for that length of time.

If you decide to import a dog without meeting the PETS scheme, you can apply for an import license and then the dog will be entered into a quarantine facility for 6 months once it reaches the UK, all of which you must pay for.

So in other words, importing a dog is lengthy and costly, but you may find it worthwhile anyway.
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Old 19-01-2011, 09:18   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yukidomari View Post

So in other words, importing a dog is lengthy and costly, but you may find it worthwhile anyway.
Well, but one can find it really difficult to find a PURE CzV in UK
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Old 19-01-2011, 20:12   #4
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So it may be worth it, after all.
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Old 19-01-2011, 23:26   #5
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I think a pup from the UK it is. There are 2 breeders here.
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Old 20-01-2011, 00:47   #6
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hello again Murph :-)

my only worry would be the crucial 'bonding' you would miss out on,as i believe the csv bond very strongly to those they meet when younger,and find it harder to make friends as they grow older..canine and human.of course there is always exception to the rule.
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Old 20-01-2011, 01:18   #7
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hey tupac it was just a thought. I wondered maybe it was easier and quicker to import a pup rather than an adult dog, but after reading up on it obviously not.
I will have my dog in 2011!!!
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Old 21-01-2011, 17:45   #8
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Murph,

It is true - the only way to have a young puppy is to get it within the UK. We looked into sending a pup from our litter last year (we are originally from the UK ourselves) but the bonding issue made it a no go. We have had pups homed at a late age tho' (10 months) and they have had no problems bonding - guess it depends on the pup/human dynamics, finding the right person for the pup.
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Old 22-01-2011, 01:24   #9
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I will only have a czech that I can have from Puppyhood... those first months are essential. The reason I chose this breed in the first place is the exceptional bond between owner and dog.
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Old 22-01-2011, 01:27   #10
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That is your choice, of course, but never forget that there are many animals rehomed or rescued who appreciate their second chance even more than their first. A dog is never too old to find a new human.
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Old 22-01-2011, 19:47   #11
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Originally Posted by yukidomari View Post
That is your choice, of course, but never forget that there are many animals rehomed or rescued who appreciate their second chance even more than their first. A dog is never too old to find a new human.
Very true but I have waited years for a czech and I want to get it right from the start
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Old 22-01-2011, 22:52   #12
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hi,iimported gus around 7, months, when i first got him he was very skitish but after a while we bonded quite quickly, at first i couldnt even put him on a lead, but to be honist, he did do a lot of travaling and then met a total strainger. then after a few days of having him he settled down and even got him walking on a lead very well. since then he has traveld all around the uk with me and even enterd dog shows over here with me and he has won 1st 3rd and 5th. although it is very hard bonding with a dog much older as long as you are patient and care about him/her its amazing what you can do. although saying that i would say that you should atleast have experiance with large, very active dogs, and make sure you get a dog that has had lots of interactive with people and animals, last thing you want to do is import a dog that is incontrolable over here. new blood lines over here are always good, there are very few at the mo, but if not meet the breeders over here, have a good chat, meet a few times, and if your not sure, dont get one...
best wishes from lee
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Old 23-01-2011, 03:38   #13
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I imported a dog to the USA at 11 months of age (male) who had lived with his breeder up until that point. It was really no problem, I bonded fully within 2 weeks (the breeder stayed with me the first week, so naturally he was very bonded to her in that time period). The important thing would be - if you decide to import - to work out the best and most comfortable arrangements for the pup, and be able to have full trust in the breeder to socialize the puppy correctly. I know there are other very successful cases of older puppies/dogs going to new homes with no real problems. And I know there are good breeders in Europe who will work with owners in such waiting periods if they know the pup is going to a perfect new home.

It's a bit more complicated of a situation to buy/import and own in the UK, but whatever your decision, please still let factors such as healthy, carefully planned (temperament, conformation, etc.) and honest breeding be your driving forces in purchasing a puppy - not just the ease or age factor. Lots of research!

Good luck and keep us posted!
Marcy
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Old 23-01-2011, 12:10   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GalomyOak View Post
I imported a dog to the USA at 11 months of age (male) who had lived with his breeder up until that point. It was really no problem, I bonded fully within 2 weeks (the breeder stayed with me the first week, so naturally he was very bonded to her in that time period). The important thing would be - if you decide to import - to work out the best and most comfortable arrangements for the pup, and be able to have full trust in the breeder to socialize the puppy correctly. I know there are other very successful cases of older puppies/dogs going to new homes with no real problems. And I know there are good breeders in Europe who will work with owners in such waiting periods if they know the pup is going to a perfect new home.

It's a bit more complicated of a situation to buy/import and own in the UK, but whatever your decision, please still let factors such as healthy, carefully planned (temperament, conformation, etc.) and honest breeding be your driving forces in purchasing a puppy - not just the ease or age factor. Lots of research!

Good luck and keep us posted!
Marcy

Thanks Marcy - this is why I started the post in the first place - I want to get the best dog possible... in all aspects: health, temperament, breeding, conformation...etc
For me it is as big a responsibility and under taking as having a child therefore the early months where you 'steer' the dogs temperament/behaviour are vital to me. Let it be me that deals with any difficulties along the way. If any mistakes are made I would prefer to take responsibility for them
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Old 23-01-2011, 15:08   #15
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Are the requirements any different under DEFRA/PETS for puppies coming from rabies-free countries? What is the earliest age puppies can be vaccinated for rabies in Europe? Here it is 3 months/12 weeks. In the case of imported puppies, they aren't supposed to leave the owner's residence until 30 days after the vaccination (quarantine period)...really a very silly rule, since rabies is all over the place in the US (in nature, mostly - raccoons, foxes and skunks), and it is a very, very difficult, almost impossible federal regulation to enforce. No titer is required to test for the effectiveness of the vaccine at any point, like it is in Europe.
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Old 23-01-2011, 17:26   #16
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You still have to wait 6 months after the vaccination.
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Old 23-01-2011, 21:21   #17
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There aren't any exceptions to the PETS scheme, even if the country of export is a WHO designated Rabies-free region..

But, you may want to look into getting a license on import. If you do the 6 months quarantine in UK, you can still visit most quarantine stations nearly everyday (except Sunday). So you can import a puppy and put him or her into a quarantine kennel (there are many, here is a listing: http://www.defra.gov.uk/wildlife-pet...fo/england.htm ) for 6 months, and you can visit quite often.

A person I know did the Hawai'i quarantine there as she did not have enough time to prepare her pets when she moved, her pets made it out fine and she got to visit often, too.
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Old 24-01-2011, 00:42   #18
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Theres no way I would do that.
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Old 24-01-2011, 05:00   #19
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Have to agree with that. CSV puppies need to be with a person, in a home - either the new owner, breeder, or some other arrangement with an experienced person. I even take my pups to work with me at school when they are little.
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Old 24-01-2011, 05:18   #20
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I agree it's not the best idea

We will have the same problem soon.. I still think that I personally would import given the situation... but yes, you will have to find something that works for you, what you feel comfortable with, what agrees with you, definitely! The rabies-free islands are always a 'special situation'....
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